Study supports bioavailability boost for liposomal Ginkgo extract

Study supports bioavailability boost for liposomal Ginkgo extract

Data published in BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies​ indicated that Ginkgosome containing 120 mg of a Ginkgo biloba extract increased plasma concentrations of ginkgolide B and C by 1.9 and 2.2-fold, compared to 120 mg of a commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract.

The study also demonstrated the long-acting/ sustained release benefits of Ginkgosome, supporting the potential of a one-a-day dose.

The study was funded by Australia-based Network Nutrition, which is part of IMCD.

Commenting on the study, Ryan Gorman, Brand Director at Network Nutrition, said: “We’re excited by the findings of this clinical trial. We have discovered that Ginkgosome is absorbed across the course of an entire day and absorbs nicely in-between daily doses. Brands formulating with Ginkgosome can talk to their consumers about how the product is working and how long it remains in the blood, giving confidence that the supplement is doing its job from one daily dose to the next.

“The results are encouraging and have prompted further research into the advantages that are possible with long-term absorption as well as improved efficacy from the use of Ginkgosome.”

Size of the market

According to ABC’s 2020 Herb Market Report (HerbalGram​ 131​), ginkgo leaf extract dietary supplements have been consistently among the 25 top-selling herbal supplements in the US, with over $33 million in sales in the combined natural and mass-market channels.

The extracts are typically used in formulations to improve cognitive and mental performance. They are also used for circulatory issues such as peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and for vertigo and tinnitus.

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